Tell Channel 7, “It’s just not cricket.”

Tell Channel 7, “It’s just not cricket.”

When 82% of staff voted down Seven Network’s proposed new enterprise agreement because of major cuts to their conditions and take home pay, Seven took the “nuclear option” and applied to terminate the current rights and conditions for their workers.

By seeking to terminate the enterprise agreement Seven is cunningly exploiting a loophole in the legislation in order to undermine the principles of a fair negotiation between employees and Seven.

Management are trying to back employees into a corner where they either give in to Seven’s demands or Seven pulls the plug on negotiations, rips their current pay ...

When 82% of staff voted down Seven Network’s proposed new enterprise agreement because of major cuts to their conditions and take home pay, Seven took the “nuclear option” and applied to terminate the current rights and conditions for their workers.

By seeking to terminate the enterprise agreement Seven is cunningly exploiting a loophole in the legislation in order to undermine the principles of a fair negotiation between employees and Seven.

Management are trying to back employees into a corner where they either give in to Seven’s demands or Seven pulls the plug on negotiations, rips their current pay and conditions out from under them and forces them back to the award wage minimums.

Terminating an enterprise agreement is corporate bullying at its worst, particularly for a company like Seven that says it can’t afford to treat its workers fairly but somehow can find the money to shower its executives with hefty bonuses – last year alone Seven paid 7 executives more than 7 million dollars. 

Why did Seven workers vote no?

Seven asked its workers to agree to things like reduced public holiday penalty rates, a new type of worker who could do the same job but be paid less and a pay offer that, in real terms, would see workers go backwards

Workers understand that the broadcasting industry is under threat, but management have proposed to cut redundancy entitlements by more than half – making it cheaper to lay off workers and outsource jobs.

Seven workers wouldn’t agree to these cuts, so management applied to terminate the agreement.

Terminating the agreement is no joke. Some workers would be hit with tens of thousands of dollars in cuts to their yearly take home pay.

Many workers in broadcasting work long and unsociable hours and undertake shift-work. Under the Award they would be significantly worse off with massive cuts to shift work and on-call loadings, consultation rights and more. And if Seven cuts jobs, their redundancy safety net will be significantly diminished!

If management’s termination bid is successful, more than 1000 people responsible for bringing cricket into living rooms across Australia, will be forced back to national minimum conditions and pay rates. It’s worse than the underarm bowl. Just because it’s in the rules doesn’t mean it’s fair.

It’s just not cricket!

 

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Send a message to Kerry Stokes

Network employees are fighting to protect the conditions and pay they rely on to continue bringing you the sport you love.

You can help by sending a message to Kerry Stokes, Chairman of the Seven Network, asking him to withdraw the application to terminate the enterprise agreement and to protect workers’ rights and Australian jobs.

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